Knee pain when sitting

Find out what could cause knee pain when sitting.

Knee pain when sitting  Knee pain varies depending on the position you get it, the frequency of feeling it, the causes and etc. And even though most people think that you need to move drastically and quickly, for instance, to feel pain, there are patients with knee pain when sitting. This is a very common syndrome, an ache that many of us feel it and a strange condition for those, who get pain only when running for, instance. Still, such motions like running might be the top reasons you have got the knee pain when sitting. But let`s say some more details about this condition, so those of you, who suffer from it get a slight idea what it could be before going to the doctor. Speaking of which, it is on mandatory for everyone with knee pain when sitting, should on mandatory make a visitation to his or her GP at first, and then to receive guides where and how to find the appropriate orthopaedic doctor.

Knee pain when sitting can be caused by damage to the joint, as from arthritis. There are two basic types of arthritis that can be standard reasons for such knee pain. Osteoarthritis is from wear and tear to the joints and is common with age. The protective tissues in the joints break down, bones can rub against each other and cause inflammation and pain. Rheumatoid arthritis is from immune system dysfunction that causes damage to the joints. Osteomyelitis is infection in the bone, and septic arthritis is infection of the joint space. Various injuries can also cause knee pain. These can include tears or rupture of cartilage, tendons, ligaments or bursa, which is a connective tissue layer. Gout is a disorder in which crystals can build up in the knee and other joints. Tumors can also cause knee pain.

But alongside with all of these reasons, we have observed that knee pain when sitting is in most cases caused by the so called Patellofemoral pain syndrome. Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a broad term used to describe pain in the front of the knee and around the patella, or kneecap. It is sometimes called "runner's knee" or "jumper's knee" because it is common in people who participate in sports—particularly females and young adults—but patellofemoral pain syndrome can occur in nonathletes, as well. The pain and stiffness it causes can make it difficult to climb stairs, kneel down, and perform other everyday activities. Many things may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Problems with the alignment of the kneecap and overuse from vigorous athletics or training are often significant factors. Symptoms are often relieved with conservative treatment, such as changes in activity levels or a therapeutic exercise program.

Besides pain, knee pain when sitting syndrome might come with other additional symptoms. This pain usually comes on gradually although trauma can cause sudden pain. The main symptom is pain in the area of the patella and behind the patella. However, the pain is diffuse and difficult to localize. Pain is usually worse when going up stairs, going down stairs, bicycling, squatting, running, and kneeling or when you sit for a long period of time. The pain usually aches but can be sharp at times. Other symptoms include crepitus about the knee and a sensation of the knee "giving way". When it comes on gradually, you may not feel it when sitting right away but, over time, the knee pain will occur all of the time.

What to do in case of knee pain when sitting?

 We would like to give you a full guide with tested tips and efficient tricks in case of knee pain when sitting. Below you will see directions and guides that might be very helpful and useful for you if you suffer from the same problem. Please, pay attention at them and contact us, if you have additional questions:
  • The first thing is, of course, a visitation to a specialist, who will precisely give you a diagnose for your case. Make sure you see a reputable and good orthopaedic doctor. He might ask you few questions about your health and physical activity story in order to get the idea what your individual treatment should be. In all cases, rely on your doctor. He knows how to treat you better than anyone else.
  • Reduce the harsh physical activity and the stressful motions.You can manage knee pain while sitting with home remedies. These include stopping the thing that causes the pain to be worse until you feel better. You may need to practice low impact exercises that won't stress the knee joint. Try swimming or bicycling as these put less tension on the knee. Try to lose weight if you are overweight by eating less and by doing the above low impact aerobic activities. Don’t resume regular activities until your knee pain has resolved.
  • RICE method – give it a try, if your doctor says it is promising for your case. You can manage knee pain while sitting with home remedies. These include stopping the thing that causes the pain to be worse until you feel better. You may need to practice low impact exercises that won't stress the knee joint. Try swimming or bicycling as these put less tension on the knee. Try to lose weight if you are overweight by eating less and by doing the above low impact aerobic activities. Don’t resume regular activities until your knee pain has resolved.
  • Taking ordinary drug products is also a part of a traditional knee pain when sitting treatment. You can also use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), including naproxen sodium (marketed as Aleve and Naprosyn) and ibuprofen (marketed as Motrin and Advil). You can also use aspirin for the pain and inflammation. These medications can decrease inflammation, swelling, and pain in the knee. See your doctor if the knee pain gets worse or doesn't get better with them. Try not to use acetaminophen (Tylenol) as this medication does not fight inflammation and only addresses the pain.
  • Rehabilitation with physical exercise under the surveillance of a specialist in the field. You can try physical therapy for knee pain when sitting, in which exercises will be recommended by a physical therapist. The exercises can improve your strength, range of motion and knee endurance. You should try to strengthen the quadriceps muscles as these help stabilize the kneecap and help the knee straighten. You may also need to take some exercise to strengthen the muscles of the abdomen and low back area.
  • Buying special device (in case of arthritis and osteoarthritis). The doctor may recommend orthotic devices. These are inserted in the shoes so that the foot and ankle are more stable. This relieves the stress in your leg and can be found at a pharmacy or made for you especially.
  • Modern interventions. The doctor can look inside the knee with an arthroscope and can scrape off any cartilage that might be loose or friable. This can be done under general anesthesia, so you don’t feel anything while it is being done.
  • Orthopaedic procedure to put the knee location on its right position. The doctor may try to put the kneecap into its proper position by moving the tendon and a part of the tibial tubercle to a different position. This realigns the patella so that you don’t get it rubbing against the bones while walking or sitting.

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